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Photo: Corbis

Non-believers typically dismiss the miracles explained in the holy bible as fiction or metaphor. However according to research, at the very least one the those an alleged impossibilities—the parting of the Red Sea come make method for Moses and also the fleeing Israelites—perhaps could have happened. 

Software engineer and lead study author Carl Drews described himself to the Washington Post as "one of plenty of Christians that accept the clinical theory of evolution." yet he says that his beliefs do not influence his science, and, together the Washington Post points out, his partner seem to mainly agree. The Red Sea work—originally undertaken together his master"s thesis—was reviewed and published in a clinical journal and also is sustained by his current employer, the prestigious National center for Atmospheric Research. 

Drews" work-related is started on the idea that, based top top a slew that archeological evidence, it wasn"t in reality the Red Sea, yet the eastern Nile Delta, at a human body of water dubbed the Lake of Tanis, that go the parting, the Washington Post explains. Given the conditions of the lake a couple thousand year ago, a coastal phenomenon dubbed a "wind setdown"—very strong winds, in various other words—could have blown in native the east, advertise the water to create a storm rise in another component of the lake, but fully clearing water from the area whereby the wind to be blowing. Together the Washington post writes, such events have happened reasonably recently in parts of Lake Erie and in the Nile Delta.

Drews created computer system models of the ancient system to display this might indeed have happened in 1250 B.C., provided the parameters the inferred around the lake, the Washington short article continues.


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Getting here at the vital moment, Moses and also the Israelites would have had around four hrs to overcome the lake, Drews found.

Of course, there space a lot of assumptions here: the the crossing did indeed occur at the lake and also not the Red Sea; that the Israelites" timing was spot-on; that Drews obtained all of the lake parameters correct; and, perhaps many importantly, that the publication of Exodus is indeed a historical account and no a occupational of fiction. Together the Post concludes, "While Drews may certainly describe an atmospheric and ocean effect that have the right to really happen, trying to indicate this phenomenon can define a biblical "event" is another matter entirely."